Kiernan, James George

From HistoryWiki

Dr. James George Kiernan, physician; neurologist

born in: New York City, on Friday, June 18, 1852;

son of: Francis Kiernan and Mary Kiernan, nee: Mary Aiken

education: public schools and 1868-71, City College of New York; graduated medical department City University of New York, 1874;

married: Jane Ann Kiernan, nee: Jane Ann Trumper in New York City, on Thursday, February 10, 1881;

children: Mrs. W.W. Edwards of Aetna, Indiana

Became Assistant Physician New York City Asylum for Insane, 1874-8,

and as officer of New York Neurological Society took active part in reforms brought about by the Society in American Psychiatry and Neurology.

Assistant Professor of nervous and mental diseases, Northwestern University, 1881-2;

Inspector for National Board of Health, 1882;

Became superintendent of Cook County Insane Hospital, in Chicago 1885,

forced the investigation of county charities in 1884, which led to the "boodle" trials and convictions of 1887.

Expert for defense in Charles J. Guiteau trial, 1881, Thomas Mooney trial, 1884,

Expert for state in Frederick Van Dyne case,

Expert for defense in Patrick Eugene Prendergast case,

and in many other criminal and civil cases in which medico-legal issues were involved.

Professor of forensic psychiatry, Kent College of Law, Chicago, 1890-1902;

Professor of mental and nervous diseases, Milwaukee Medical College, 1894-7;

Professor of neurology, Chicago Post-Graduate School, 1903-4;

Professor of medical jurisprudence. Dearborn Medical College, Chicago, 1904;

Professor of nervous diseases, Illinois Medical College, 1906-8;

now Professor of nervous and mental disease, Chicago Hospital College of Medicine.

Expert for defense in Guiteau trial, 1881,

Expert for defense in Thomas Mooney trial, 1884,

and in many other criminal and civil cases in which medico-legal issues were involved.

Foreign associate member of French Medico-Psychologic Association (Société Médico-Psychologique of Paris);

Fellow of Chicago Academy of Medicine;

Honorary President of the Nervous and Mental Diseases section, of the Pan-American Medical Congress, 1893;

member of the International Medical Congress, 1900;

Honorary member of the Chicago Neurological Society;

Professor of forensic psychiatry, Kent College of Law, Chicago;

Formerly professor of mental and nervous diseases, Milwaukee Medical College;

Professor of neurology, Chicago Post-Graduate School, 1903-4;

Professor of medical jurisprudence, Dearborn Medical College;

contributor to medical and scientific journals on insanity, neurology, psychiatry.

Democrat.

Club: Press Club.

Office: 103 State Street. (1905), 31 N. State Street. (1911, 1917).

Residence: 808 W. Pratt Avenue (1905); 1644 W. Pratt Avenue, (1911); 1522 W. Greenleaf Avenue (1917).

Source: Book of Chicagoans, 1905, Book of Chicagoans, 1911, page 386; Book of Chicagoans, 1917.