The Indian Boundary Line

The Broadmoor Hotel

by Hank Morris The Broadmoor Hotel, 7600 North Bosworth was built in 1922-23 by developers Louis Rubin and Abraham Marks, this six-story building was one of the most luxurious buildings of its day. It had 90 apartments and 7 stores, which were accessible from the lobby and the street. From 1924 to 1927, WBBM radio

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Indian Boundary Park

by Hank Morris Around 1835 when Philip Leonard Rogers arrived in the area that would bear his name, he wanted to establish a profitable trading post with the indians. Pottawattomie, Chippewa and Ottawa tribes lived in the area before Europeans arrived. Rogers built a log cabin right near the intersection of what is now Lunt

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B’nai Zion, First Synagogue in Rogers Park

by Hank Morris The congregation of B’nai Zion, made history by being the first Conservative synagogue in Rogers Park and Chicago; it is a group which was established and remained in a neighborhood never predominantly Jewish despite a sizable number of Jews; and was a synagogue which adapted to demographic change of the sort that

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Calvary Cemetery

According to the Encyclopedia of Chicago, “In Chicago, the living and the dead have always sought the same space: high and dry land with good transportation.” In the 1830s, the 60-acre City Cemetery and the smaller Catholic Cemetery ran north and south of North Avenue along the Green Bay Ridge in present-day Lincoln Park. In

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For Whom were our Parks and Public Schools Named?

by Hank Morris Schools: West Ridge: George Buchanan Armstrong School of International Studies 2110 W. Greenleaf Ave., Chicago, IL 60645 George Buchanan Armstrong (1822-1871): developed railway postal service. Armstrong was born in Ireland and moved to Chicago in 1854. He became the Assistant Postmaster and helped to develop a railway postal service. Armstrong was appointed

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Cuneo Mausoleum

Colleen Taylor Sen There are two Cuneo Mausoleums North of the entrance to Calvary Cemetery in Evanston that belonging to the Cuneo family, who founded the Cuneo Press and later Cuneo Hospital. The busts of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Cuneo flank the door of their mausoleum on the north wall. Their son John is interred

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The Rogers Park Library

by Hank Morris The first Rogers Park Library was a private one established in 1874 in the Old Doland block on Clark Street. It was opened by the Rogers Park Woman’s Club, who worked as librarians and books were donated until 1917. In 1905, the Chicago Public Library took over the Rogers Park collection and

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Sheridan Rd., Devon to City Limits

Named after Civil War General Philip Henry Sheridan (March 6, 1831 – August 5, 1888), who took charge of restoring law and order after the Great Chicago Fire of 1871, this thoroughfare offers a peek-a-boo view of Lake Michigan as you pass each east-west street. Just east of Sheridan Road, the “street-end” beaches offer residents

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A Brief History of West Ridge

by Hank Morris The history of West Ridge is so intertwined with that of Rogers Park that, at times, the two seem inseparable. When Rogers Park was incorporated in 1878, it extended west to the larger of two geological ridges running fairly parallel with the shore line of Lake Michigan. The smaller ridge is known

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The Indian Boundary Line

by Hank Morris Like many diagonal streets that interrupt the grid patterned streets of Chicago, Rogers Avenue comes from a past far earlier than the surveyors who laid out Chicago’s streets. An ancient Indian trail, the passageway we now know as Rogers Avenue holds a special historic significance. On August 24, 1816, the Treaty of

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